How Long Do Benzodiazepines Stay in Your System?

How Long Do Benzodiazepines Stay in Your System?

What are Benzodiazepines?

Benzodiazepines are GP-prescribed medications that are designed to act as anti-depressants. For patients they are used to help lower stress and anxiety, helping calmness, relaxation and sleep.

Recreational use of benzodiazepines is a growing problem in the UK. As drugs of abuse, Benzodiazepines are generally used to supplement a “high” experienced from another drug, or to lessen the negative effects.

Benzodiazepines are also known as Benzos, temazies, jellies, eggs, moggies and vallies.

How Long Do Benzodiazepines Stay in Your System?

There are many variables that will determine how long benzodiazepines are detectable in the body. One important consideration is the type of drug test being used to do the testing (urine, saliva or hair) as each type of tests works within a specific timetable of detection.

Benzodiazepines are only detectable within a short time-frame with some types of drug tests. Other types of drug tests can still pick up drug usage up to three months later.

Another important factor that will determine how long benzodiazepines are detectable in the system is the physical makeup of the individual. Here a number of variables combine – body mass, physical activity, state of health, hydration – making it virtually impossible to indicate an exact amount of time in which benzodiazepines will show up on a drug test.

Detection Times for Benzodiazepines

Benzodiazepines can be detected by various testing methods. Saliva drug tests are best for detecting very recent use or for impairment. Urine tests detect drug use in the last few days. A hair follicle test offers the longest history but can’t be used until a week after drug usage.

The following is an estimated range of detection times for Benzodiazepines using the three main types of drug test:

Saliva Drug Test: Up to 48 Hours
Urine Drug Test: 2-14 days
Hair Follicle Drug Test – up to 90 days

For more information of drug tests for Benzodiazepines, please contact Zoom Testing.

Photo: Image courtesy of epSos.de on Flickr

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